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the past 50 years. today america has its first black president. >> i barack hussein obama do solemnly swear -- >> and african americans do routinely hold top posts like secretary of state, attorney general, national security advisor. top corporations like merck, american express, mcdonald's and xerox have had or have now black ceo's. oprah winfrey is america's second black billionaire, following in the footsteps of publishing mogul robert l johnson. african americans are among the country's top sports stars and celebrities in fields one restricted by racing, swelling the ranks of black millionaires. yet in other ways america is far from king's dream. racial divides persist in income, educational achievement, and poverty. question, are we less conscious of race today than in 1963, more conscious of race today, or are things about the same? pat buchanan. >> i think we're probably more conscious right now, john, but i was at the march on washington. i was up there in the lincoln memorial when dr. king gave that address. and it was a moment really when the cresting of the civil rights movement,
of america through the senses. the population reached 17 million in 26 states. we consistently see 30%. slaves #2.5 million, which is almost 15% of the population, and new orleans joins the list of the largest cities in the united states. we heard about the tylers and their attitude toward slavery. give us an indication of what was happening in 1840. >> this is a tremendous time of sexual tension. we like to think the country is divided regionally, that everyone in the north is anti slavery and everyone in the south is proslavery. it is not that simple. people in the north benefited from slavery and the slave trade until it was ended. they now move into a different economic arena. they no longer need slavery, and slippery as a threat to them because of the free labor system in the north, and the kinds of the economy that is needed to preserve institutions in the north are different from those in the south, so what is happening in congress is both groups want to control legislation, because if you are in more industrialized regions, we want certain parts of laws passed to preserve the
to the role that america has played in that region for a long time. now, it's important that people know that, to get your point, because it's important for people understand what we're doing, why we're doing it, to understand first of all that our alliances are strong and we stand behind our alliances. second, that we are not picking a fight with anyone. we are not trying to militarize a situation there. we would like what has been happening in decades past to keep going. democracy has been spreading across -- prosperity has been spreading to a huge economic and political development and a part of world without any conflict at all. so that's the fight that we have on the pivot and that's why we're doing it and that's why we're saying what we're doing. nobody it's the wrong idea by the duty provided the of why we're doing it spent we only had a couple of minutes left and mechanical of our time because the to the invoke year is they put us on planes and send us back. we will take two questions. kimberly and no here. we'll take a cu key and then you can pick which one you're answering. >> you m
the baseballs, there might be no financial crisis. >>> meanwhile, somewhere in america, a deranged woman you probably worked with is now writing her first love letter to ariel castro in prison despite the fact he slut shamed his victims during sentence. we'll uncover the slut shaming from rush limbaugh to castro on tonight's f bomb. today is the birthday of the late jerry garcia, also the birthday of my favorite rapper, public enemy leader chuck d and coolio is 50. how did that happen? i mention the musical artists today because mtv has a birthday they launched on this date in 1981 when the letters in their logo stood for music television. they dropped the words music television in 2010 proving once and for all that mtv now stands for nothing. this is "viewpoint." >> john: good evening, friends, i'm john fuglesang. this is "viewpoint." white house officials and democrats in both houses screamed from the rooftops about how bad sequestration would be. after the g.o.p. rammed it through both houses and john boehner boasted he got 98% of what he wanted, republicans said and i'm paraphrasing here
standards that are in little of informational texts. america is seeing two paths. choice or centralized education by the common core national standards. we have a choice to make. are we going to be a self- governing society or are a -- or society governed by despotism. a portion of one of the many education related events during c-span cost -- c-span's town hall program. we invite you to join the conversation. it starts tonight, 7:30 p.m. eastern time >> tonight on "first ladies." sofrances cleveland is popular. people are imitating her hairstyle. of her for piece themselves. we have always hurt as if we if we owned the first lady peered pictures of the first lady lady became extremely popular. you could purchase your own picture to have in your home. she is used in campaigns. we also have ms. cleveland running for first lady. >> the encore presentation of "first ladies" continues tonight at 9:00 eastern leading up to our live event at 11:00 this morning with the help secretary, we will hear about health care from vic morris, the former linton white house adviser. he speaks for about 25
, the weekly standard, and the group concerned veterans for america. coming. you all for i am normally not intimidated at these events, but now that i realized who is here, now i am very worried. have all of you. i also want to thank you for your service, how pleased i am that peter king and john stossel have agreed to be here, judy miller and john bernstein as well. in afghanistan, i was visiting with a couple of people in 2011. to trainvolunteered the afghan army. i remember him telling me at the time one of the key principles was to keep it simple. that is a key military principle. pete organized this event in the opposite way. two speakers, four panelists, john and i are co-moderators. luckily, the quality of the people overwhelm the complexity. we will have peter king speak for 10 minutes, john stossel speak for 10 minutes, and then we will have a panel. judy and gary will kick off, and a discussionhave it ihave of security. these are people who have thought seriously about this. i will give a brief introduction of pete king and john stossel and then get off the stage. peter king
is better for our friends and neighbors and ourselves than what they believe. >> and the america i live in disagreement is a way of life, that's how you get better solutions. you know, i don't want to be in an america where you cannot have dissent or disagreement. >> reporter: priebus warned the gop about being too combative at the expense of the conservative movement. >> if you just want to be angry, if you don't want to be a problem solver, you're putting yourself ahead of the movement, you're putting your personal ambition in front of your patriotic duty. >> reporter: what republicans seem most excited about, the digital campaign. there's a lot of work to do to catch up with democrats. but they'll roll out more this fall. >> thanks. >>> stocks finished on a down note. dow lost 31, s&p 500 fell 5, nasdaq dropped three for the week, dow lost 2.25%, worst week this year. s&p 500 dropped a little over 2%, nasdaq about a point and a half. >>> speaking of big money, the obama administration has bet and lost heavily on green energy. think solyndra. that has not stopped the white house from
oliver. i am still in for jon stewart who is scourge competing to be america's next top model. oh, no, they voted him out! they voted him-- don't listen to them, jon. you're beautiful on the inside! and there is no shame being more catalog than editorial. that's a fact. my guest tonight the writer, director, and staffer a very funny new movie "in a world" lake bell will be here. very good, very good. but we begin tonight with breaking news. >> the big chill between the u.s. and russia may be heading for the deep freeze. president obama has officially canceled his one-on-one meeting with vladimir putin. >> john: canceled? wow, that's a big diplomatic slap in the face, a dip move, if you will. ( laughter ) although if the president really wanted to hurt putin he would have said he was coming and just stood him up. trust me, that hurts a lot more. or if you wanted to be more passive aggressive the president could have said let's meet somewhere that's not technically in russia like, i don't know, moscow airport. ( cheers and applause ) look, we all know-- we all know why this meeting was
to this year's printer's row literary festival to hear about "the cooked seed." then on to bookexpo be america in new york city city with erica jong who talks about "fear of flying." and we finish with author and radio talk show host larry elder at the los angeles times festival of books as he discusses his memoir about his troubled relationship with his father in "dear father, dear son." booktv in prime time all this week on c-span2. >> c-span, created by america's cable companies in 1979, brought to you as a public service by your television provider. >> host: well, with the announcement this week that "the washington post" has been sold to jeff bethos, we thought we'd take this opportunity to look at changes in the newspaper industry and the potential future of the news industry in general. we have two guests joining us this week. first, we want to introduce you to alan mutter. he is in san francisco, and he is a newspaper consultant, he's a lecturer as well at the university of california berkeley on media economics, and he has served as a newspaper editor, a cable tv executive and a tech
holly williams they're advising america where to attack. and is the comeback over? wall street worries about war and housing. >> a cbs news poll finds race relations are going backward in the u.s. we're on the national mall, marking 50 years since the historic march on washington. a ground-breaking court ruling says you can be in trouble for sending a text to someone who is driving. >> we begin this morning with a look at today's "eye opener," your world in 90 seconds. >> if the order comes, you're ready to go, like that? >> we're ready to go like that. >> washington weighs the consequences for syria. >> u.s.-led military strike against syria could be launched as early as tomorrow. >> this is turning into a regional conflict and we need to reverse it. now is an opportunity to do so. >> the dow had its worst day since june. as possible military strikes hangs over wall street. >> bragging about taking control over media websites including twitter and "the new york times." >> fire continues to spread near yosemite. now growing 280 square miles, destroying more than 100 buildings. >> final
or bad. yes, the long-term concern is there. if the papers go away america will be in very serious trouble because when you get down to it the television reporters are , what that one guy said, they are lap poodles. it is basically nothing more than lap pools for house members here in phoenix. you just do not know what is going on in washington from the electronic media at all. for the callou this morning. on that subject that you talked about on the future of newspapers and specifically what might happen with "the washington post," and this bezos -- by jeff might've contributed to part the sale. here's a bit of what he said. [video clip] was latemily was in -- in adopting a payroll product, which most of the major market has already started doing. the fact that they could've started that years ago, the way the financial times or the wall street journal had done years ago, i think maybe that certainly hastens their financial difficulties, that they were so late to doing a pay wall. politico is a block in bc. they have a high tier subscription product, which seems to be doing very w
in a row is pretty suspicious and bank of america says they'll try to -- >> common practice, it happens constantly with young kids in that -- >> sad story. >> drinking red bull and coffee. >> yeah. >> that's just the culture? >> absolutely. >> but let's not in any way start to assign a bank or anybody else -- >> no, no, not a bank, just the culture of investment banking. >> and it's the culture of the competitive nature for college kids now trying to get jobs. it is, you bust a gut to try to get these, even unpaid internships, maybe not pulling three all-nighters. >>> the "new york daily news." dr. oz came to the rescue of a 23-year-old british tourist. the tourist was sitting near a fountain outside of this building, rockefeller center, when a taxi cab jumped the curb, trying to run down a bicyclist in what witnesses say was a foot of road rage. dr. oz heard the crash and went to the scene to assist the victim along with other first responders. reports say she lost part of one leg. apparently there was a plumber there, he used his belt as a tourniquet and that helped save her life. >>
for president obama in 2008 the first time with the sincere expectation his election would make america more popular around the globe. that hasn't happened. why? >> it hasn't happened. the president said he was going to remake america's image in the world. i think a lot of people thought because he did have a charismatic personality, certainly the president himself believes himself to be charismatic, he was going to be able to win more friends for america, that america would suddenly be beloved by all. what the president seems not to understand, what is most important in terms of a country's standing is that you are respected not necessarily liked. so the president's effort to make everyone like us i think has made us look weak. >> so it's had the opposite effect? >> that's exactly right. what's happened is, the united states is perceived as, first of all, tenuous about making decisions. we had what happened in egypt, for example, the administration was really i think very slow and has still been slow to understand the muslim brotherhood was not democratic. we had the president drawing lines
and our values. and to others around the world, i want to make clear once again that america is not interested in spying on ordinary people. our intelligence is focused above all on finding the information necessary to protect our people and, in many cases, detect our allies. it's true -- protect our allies. it's true, we have surveillance capability, but it is also true that we have shown a restraint that many governments around the world won't even think of doing or refuse to show. that includes, by the way, some of america's most of her -- most we should not. forget stricter guidelines. some other governments will throw their citizens in prison for what they say online. let me close with one additional thought. the men and women of our intelligence community work every single day to keep us safe because they love this country and believe in our values. they are patriots. and i believe that those who have lawfully raised their voices on the -- on behalf of privacy and civil liberties are also patriots who love our country and want to live up to our highest ideals. so this i
. and people all over america are experiencing in the mail every day sticker shock over their premiums and now, the internet is more organized and sophisticated to get out that anger in large numbers, don't you think? >> there is certainly anger and you will so insurance companies, u.s. chamber of commerce, get out there and sell a message that the sales tax on health care insurance will hurt consume sxers then the president and his organization trying to push people to enroll in to this to make the argument to help folks. but remember, there is not a bill hang negligent balance here and as much as the house tried to repeal all or part was health care reform. >> it is delay and so forth. but let me move on to immigration and what people refer to as amnesty. one group in particular that is fighting against amnesty and they have organized 58,000 people to either get out on the streets in protest or contact their congressman at their home offices. they know where they live in the home districts. what did that immigration? >> on immigration, you will have both sides gearing up here. folks that are
.m. eastern here on cing span 3. c-span2. >> c-span, created by america's cable companies in 1979, brought to you as a public service by your it's provider -- by your television provider. >> host: and this week on "the communicators," gordon smith who is president and ceo of the national association of broadcasters, our guest reporter is paul kirby of telecommunications report. senator smith, you started at nab nearly four years ago. how have the issues changed in those four years? >> guest: well, it seems like the issues just keep on coming, and they tend to be very major issues affecting both radio and television. but clearly on the radio side, the whole issue of performance rights, performance tax, whatever you want to tribe it as, is an ongoing challenge. hopefully, the day will arrive when both the digital and the terrestrial platform can come up with a model that actually grows music and works for both. but right now one has an unsustainable business model, and the other one works for radio, but on the other hand, we need it to work for the performers too. but if you provide a rate t
boy. but anyway, this was actually -- you know, mika, you were probably too young, but america stopped, actually. >> absolutely. >> america stopped and it was -- there was something shocking about a man playing a woman in tennis. >> a man getting his butt kicked. >> well because -- >> yeah. >> joe -- >> paid off. by the way -- >> time to move on -- >> we should have seen this. >> the last gasp of the republican party, right? >> should have seen this a mile away. >> the republican party? >> they don't like women, right? >> it was rigs. >> the only guy -- the only way they could beat a man was if he threw the match, right? >> joe, you're missing a wild -- >> i'm hearing it, but, howard, proves once and for all, the hate mail on twitter today is a marxist because everything, absolutely everything, goes back to politics for marxists. all right. there we go. >> joe calls howard marksesist on -- >> don't -- marxist, everything goes back to politics. >> i don't know no. >> i'm not talking about your ideology but the tennis match and you bring it back to republicans. >> miley cyrus. >> come on
from big government back over to big business, saying corporate america to to blame, why would i draw attention to myself, my firm and industry for that matter and risk -- >> you become a target? >> if you were an indendent, strong talking aigovernment for smaller government business guy, you risk getting shot down by the president. as anti-american in some way, he you i predent who has an open contempt for business in many ways, you didn't build that somebody else did. you have over stock patrick byrne and do gdaddy's bob parson you have people what are willing to tea speak there mind but thee are more people running scared. >> do you think it is hose who do r -- those who do rub folks the wrong wayhat get things done are those who standout, and maybe washington could take a lesson from that to be willing to agitate? >> that is possible we see that in future, but right now talking abouthese leader talking outside the box, upside stops at a distracti, washington is not calling businesses, in what they think in terms of getting america back on track, we're still in a environment wre bu
for your ice ballet. come on, come on, now. is there nothing else that led america to this. >> president obama is cancelling his meeting with russia's president putin over tensions becausest n.s.a. leaker edward snowden. >> john: yes, that is clearly the only reason. it's-- it's always a good idea to pad out with what you really want to say with self-righteous human rights stuff like, "kimberly, we need a break. i don't like your stance on chine and tibetan monks and your boobs are weirding me out." if we want snowden back all we need to do is convince vladimir putin that snowden is gay. that away wayhe'llob a plane into u.s. custody faster than a definitely not homoerotic team of elastic clad men. that quick. actually, russia is not only global leadership story we're dealing with tonight which brins us to our new segment... indeed. now, we've already dealt with russia, so let's see where our magical dploab will take us next egypt! egypt. i just lift egypt. i'm not-- i'm not used to guns. ( laughter ) as the situation in egypt continues to devolve, the u.s. like a polar bear on a hastily
% of all children live in poverty. >> stephanie: in america. >> in america. >> stephanie: you say your wealth inequality statistics are staggering, and people just hear that, but i think they don't know what that means, but the word staggering, i think is dead on, don't you? >> yeah, i mean there's words in the industrialized nation, and it has gotten a lot worse, and what he used to pride ours on, what the american dream has always been, it's upward mobility that you can be born with nothing and then die a rich person. and the statistics now are that this really doesn't happen anymore. you get to be in the middle class the same way you get to be king, by virtue of birth. we just don't move anymore >> stephanie: and how do we resolve these numbers by kicking the downed to -- down-trodden. poor shaming is the justification that people are -- leave it to americans to kick people when they are down. and that's what they did again with the farm bill. >> they tell poor people to get a job. and they have a job, and they say they can't feed their family or pay their rent, and republicans say
by french revolutionaries and the a were influencing people in america. there were rumors that cities would be burned. it was terrorism they were anticipating. for example, the opposition party, the democratic republican party was very enthusiastic about the french and some of the ideals of the french revolution. >> jefferson in particular. >> this is where they begin to go in different directions. also, some of the press is very vehement in their criticism of the administration. so they muzzled the press and said that this is probably the thing that john adams is most criticized for. abigail, i believe, supported john. abigail was even more vehement during i think she is even more conservative than john during that time. >> the upshot of this, the people who were breaking the alien and sedition acts -- >> you could be jailed. >> it was said that the press made things up. he had no standards. it was not the they were supporting the french, but they were making up stories that were not the truth europe adams was very seriously worried about this. jefferson -- that were not the truth. adams w
like "spying," "snooping." does anybody think general alexander wants to snoop on america? i think that demeans the whole political dialogue and that's why i wish the president would be more outgoing and defend the n.s.a. a lot more than he did. this has really bane sland or the thousand of good men and women who every day dedicate their thrives our country and particularly general alexander, who is as patriotic as anyone i have ever met in government or anywhere. and there is too much loose talk here. again, every time i hear snooping and spying, it just drives me crazy. dutch and i know what these men and women are doing and they're absolutely dedicated patriots. >> i just want to point out, peter and chairman roarnlings, we have a very bipartisan committee in the intelligence committee. we zfar left. we have far right. but we work together as a team because the stakes are too high. and that's a very important issue. peter, i thank you for being on with us today and i agree a lot of your points. >> schieffer: thanks to both of you. i'll be back in just a second. chronic plaque ps
of america, of giving asylum to edward snowden, the president absolutely cannot go to a bilateral conversation with vladimir putin. >> so there's always a little moment for me, when condi rice and president obama are on the same policy page that always makes me want to pause and say, let's talk about that. do you agree? >> absolutely. i think the reset was great. they got as much out of it as you could. they got the start treaty, the transit route to afghanistan through russia, but then, things started to kind of go sour around the time of libya. the russians felt duped. they had abstained from vetoing at the security council. they couldn't vote in favor of it, but they abstained and felt the u.s. did a lot more than they said they were going to do. on their watch, qaddafi was killed. and the ambassador was harassed for months on the ground, in a very unprofessional, very sort of, this is not what states do to each other. and it went on from there. syria was a major irritant. and what you heard from the white house during this period was like, look, if you guys don't want to talk,
. thank you and god bless america. >> i think we go we go inside ? >> we have a signing station set in the air conditioning. >> it's in air conditioning. >> those of us in wool are looking forward to the air conditioning. >> you do that. you're the boss. i'm just the passenger. college is nice, isn't it? >> we will take a moment and get ourselves oriented. we are leaving downtown gettysburg. the train will be moving in a westerly direction. >> does this train go parallel to the route that he came down or hill came down? i think so. you may want to get on and explain that at some point or have bill do it. you do have a narration? you may want to have somebody actually do the narration if that makes sense. >> it was just over that hill where the fighting took place very early in the morning july 1, 1863. >> i think either you or bill should give the narration. bill knows vastly more about the details than i do. but it's your train. i will say something general. >> walk through the park. hi, how are you? good. aren't you wa-good. aren't you warm? >> very warm, sir. >> saw you on bill o
in america." the pendulum is swinging in the republican party now. as the party moves hard right, will they really try another establishment time like romney or dole or mccain or christie or jeb bush? or will the party go for one of its tea party heroes like rand paul? here with me now is the author of the great book "collision 2016." dan, let's talk about what you call the subterranean campaign of 2012 and what it offers us in the future. >> we think of the campaign as the campaign we all cover all the time. everything we talk about, every utterance, every gaffe, every debate, every movement. and that's part of politics and in many ways the interesting and enjoyable part of politics, but it's not necessarily the decisive part of politics. there are important and powerful underlying forces that effect every campaign. in 2012, one was the economy. would it be just good enough to allow president obama to win re-election or bad enough to deny re-election. another was voter anger. which direction would it go? a third was the deep red/blue divide and how that shaped attitudes beyond w
states and said south and latin america which was very unusual for a. so she had the wanderlust from the time she was a year and grow , very proud -- war of the fact. making the best of the best situation. then once she married is was a way to escape both the bush justice of the children, or have some of the onset of the weaknesses and in some way perhaps also a form of birth control pill is a catholic church would not have allowed any. >> she even maintained her schumer. the early 1970's. if i had known it was a competition and might have had more than nine permit. >> happy to surpass. >> one trip when they went to russia and then it was unusual for women. >> 1937, as of this would have been prior. >> her son in the apple of her eye had guns hang fund. -- the epitome of a capitalist and he said, you need to know the ways of future. socialism may be one of them. absolutely for the year between reps cool and when he went to harvard he went to london to study and then spent some time in the soviet this well fact-finding and would report back. so taken with his report that she decided t
four-year-old in america it's time for the minimum wage to go up. (cheers) but i won't be able to do it alone, so i'm going to be calling... on all of us to take up this cause. good jobs; a better bargain for the middle class... and the folks who are working to get into the middle class; an economy that grows from the middle-out. that's what we need. (cheers) >>> you can join the "news nation" on twitter. find us at our twitter page @newsnation. meanwhile, strikes from fast food restaurants across the nation tops our story today. the protesters picked up steam this week. workers are growing louder for higher wages and the right to form a union. the national restaurant association which represents many of the restaurants where workers are protesting claims they operate on very thin profit margins and raising wages could hamper their ability to hire. >> dozens of people exchanged vous at midnight as same-sex marriage became legal in those states. couples in rhode island began tying the knot this morning. >>> and george zimmerman resurfaces again, this time texas dash cam video shows an
. they basically i believe probably are looking at all the cell phone calls in america every day. also, i don't think it's good police work. i think we get overwhelmed with data. we have so much data that he we don't notice when the -- goes back to check that, his name is misspelled and we don't know he has gone back. we need more people doing specific intelligence data on people who we have suspicion of rather than doing it on suspicion list severance of all american phone calls. >> john: let me switch gears and talk to you about obama care because that is going to be a big topic of discussion when congress comes back in a couple of weeks. you support the defunding of obama care but you recently acknowledged you don't believe it will happen and get through the senate. your only leave then lever is to defund obama care. that would shut down the government which you have stated publicly you don't think is a good idea. what do you really have left here, senator? >> well, i don't think shutting down the government is a good idea. but i do think that we were elected, conservatives were elected to
Search Results 0 to 44 of about 45 (some duplicates have been removed)